The Imitation Game | Notes

Posted on December 4, 2015


“Sometimes it is the very people who no one imagines anything of who do the things that no one can imagine.”

imitation game

Are you paying attention?
If you’re not
listening carefully,
you will miss things,
important things.
I will not pause.
I will not repeat myself,
and you will not interrupt me.
You think that because
you are sitting where you are
and I am sitting where I am
that you are in control
of what is about to happen.
You’re mistaken.
I am in control.
Because I know things that you
do not know.

Have you ever won a war before, Turing? I have. Do you know how it’s done. Order. Discipline. Chain of command. You’re not at University any longer. You are a very small cog in a very large system and you’ll do as your commanding officer instructs.

Do you know why people like violence? Because it feels good. Humans find violence deeply satisfying. But remove the satisfaction, and the act becomes…hollow.

Can machines think? Can they? Could machines ever think as human beings do? The problem is that you’re asking a stupid question. Of course machines can’t think “as human beings do.” A machine is different from a human being; hence, it would think differently. The interesting question is, just because something thinks differently from you, does that mean it’s not thinking? We allow that humans have such divergences from one another. You like strawberries. I hate ice-skating. You cry at sad films. I’m allergic to pollen. What does it mean to have different tastes — different preferences — other than to say that our brains work differently? That we think differently from one another? And if we can say that about each other, why can’t we say the same for brains made of copper and steel?

You’re not God, Alan. You don’t get to decide who lives and who dies. Yes, we do. Because no one else can.
Posted in: History, Technology