The Unbelievers | Review

Posted on September 9, 2014


The Unbelievers, 2013 [NR] f5564fda6d1b68ab56293a22f958eb4a Really, there isn’t much to review. This film is the equivalent of being the proverbial “fly on the wall,” to the “dynamic duo of science,” in their exhaustive travels from one public appearance to another. It’s fun to glimpse a small amount behind the scenes, but content wise, nothing is necessarily new or different from what could be seen on the tens of thousands of videos (millions?) of both Dawkins and Krauss. However, if one is unfamiliar with the breadth and scope of influence these two have had in the world, then this film is not a bad place to start. Auditoriums packed full of a new breed of groupies, pining over the almost deified representatives of reason will awaken the newcomer to a whole new world, one that demands an intellectual rigor that is engaged in by a minority, but often demanded of the majority. If received well, it will condemn (enlighten?!) the viewer to hundreds of hours of discussion that is worth considering in the public debate on faith and science. I do hope (and pray) that the religious amongst us would humble themselves and elevate the discipline of thoughtful, reasonable, and respectful discourse. I do believe that the philosophies of religion and theology are important for discussion and have much to contribute to the public “ethos, pathos, and logos.” They are, truly, meaningful. Unfortunately, many “believers” unknowingly and unwittingly forsake truth a priori in favor of religious arguments–that defense and suspicion make up the fearful attitude upon which all discussion takes place. This not only need not be, it is damaging to the value of truth in this world. Perhaps we could take an interpretive lens from the history of the Jewish people as an analogue. Like other nations were interpreted as bringing judgment upon God’s people for their lack of faithfulness, so too it may be reasonable to consider the vociferously secular attacks against the religious as God’s judgment on the ideologically dogmatic. Perhaps it is time to remember our most primal creed, “Listen!”