Charter For Compassion | TED Prize Winner

Posted on November 13, 2008


This site launched today (November 13).


The front site reads:

Help us create a
Charter for Compassion
People of all nations, all faiths, all backgrounds, are invited to contribute.

By recognizing that the Golden Rule is fundamental to all world religions, the Charter for Compassion can inspire people to think differently about religion. This Charter is being created in a collaborative project by people from all over the world. It will be completed in 2009. Use this site to offer language you’d like to see included. Or inspire others by sharing your own story of compassion.

I’m intrigued and blessed.

In April, 2008 a conference entitled the “Seeds of Compassion” hosted the Dalai Lama and several representatives from various faiths. After that event, I started a blog post (that I never finished) entitled “The Seeds of Compassion Bearing Contemptible Fruit.” An odd and seemingly discouraging title, no doubt provocative. Here’s my thoughts on that conference, and a final thought on the Charter for Compassion.



In various conservative Christian circles, any mixing between Christians and other religions, even when it is around common ethics, is seen as sinful and an abomination. Quoting various Bible passages, these sectarian Christians say that there ought not be any mixing of “light” and “darkness.” Of the blogs and comments I’ve read, any partnership compromises the truth of Jesus as the only way to God. Their comments and rhetoric are strict, and at times virulent.

It must also be said that this “Christian” voice is not the only voice out there of the Christian kind. Many believe that the Biblical proof-texting done by these opponents of endeavors such as the two above is a misrepresentation and misuse of the Scriptures and ought to be cautiously condemned along with other sins and behaviors mentioned and taught in the Bible. This view suggests that it is possible to voice a “Christian” view and be in opposition to Jesus’ teachings, and the grand narrative of the Scriptures.

So, let us commend any effort, and any endeavor that seeks to advance the same values and goals of the Biblical narrative.